Rianti Bieler

  • published Reusable Containers 2020-06-29 09:18:10 +1000

    Reusable Containers

    Our aim is to rapidly accelerate adoption of reusable and refillable foodware and containers by product providers, business and consumers. Apart from avoiding single use plastics in the first place, the next best solution is to reuse containers. This eliminates waste and ensures containers stay in use for as long as possible.

    We have identified five scenarios on which to focus. Whilst food safety standards do prevent unmanaged reusable container use, properly designed services are available and active in Australia and around the world that show it can be done.

    The International Standard (ISO 1860:2013) outlines the requirements of reusable packaging to reduce its environmental footprint (compared to single use) and be designed to achieve a minimum number of trips or rotations.

     

    Our Goals

    1. Events

      • All public events to adopt reusable/refillable foodware policies that support reusables and, where possible, incorporate reusable/returnable container services into operations.

      • Every national, state, local jurisdiction should include reusable/refillable foodware policies for any events they manage or for any events that require permits or funding support (by 2021).

      • Reusable Foodware policies for events should be based upon a continuous improvement approach and initially focus on the use of reusable/returnable/refillable foodware provision by event organisers and vendors and the introduction of reusable/returnable containers for product transport by suppliers.

    2. Takeaway outlets

      • Food outlets allow/ initiate customer returnable/refillable services for takeaway food and drink

    3. Supermarkets/retail

      • Major supermarkets to introduce returnable/refillable container service for their customers to access delicatessen and identified other food services by 2021.

    4. Specific controlled environments

      • All government office precincts (that include food outlets) to introduce (or include in new or renewed vendor contracts) a requirement to allow/promote returnable/refillable foodware services or earlier with agreement of vendors. (Other office precincts are encouraged to implement similar requirements)
      • Other locations (e.g. universities, public institutions) to initiate returnable/refillable service and networks where under management control.

    5. Transport (ISO 22984)

      • Manufacturers, retailers and transport logistics companies can introduce reusable/returnable containers for bulk deliveries now. These should be introduced coupled with investment and research to investigate further reusable/returnable container use in the future.

     

    Back to Zero Plastic Pollution page >>


  • published Cut the Wrap 2020-06-29 09:17:24 +1000

    Cut the Wrap

    Our aim is to ensure that problematic and unnecessary single use plastic packaging is eliminated by supermarkets and other retailers. In keeping with the national target, all plastic packaging needs to be avoided where unnecessary or reused, composted or recycled.

    For any plastic packaged product to be labelled as reusable, compostable or recyclable, it must be able to demonstrate that it is indeed reused, composted or recycled.

    Boomerang Alliance is campaigning to ensure this happens and the national packaging goals for 2025 are met.

     

    Our Goals

    • All retailers to phase-out excessive plastic packaging, firstly of fresh food and vegetables by 2021, followed by other non-putrescible and ‘brand’ products (continuous improvement).

    • Where packaging cannot be avoided, by 2021, switch to packaging that will be reused, composted or recycled based upon accepted standards, at scale, across multiple regions.

    • Take action to eliminate unnecessary single-use packaging items through re-design, innovation or alternative packaging by 2021

    • Phase out polystyrene within 3 months

    • Remove single use plastics from outdoor activities/picnic sections and replace with reusable/compostable alternatives (reusable/certified compostable coffee cups, cups, plates, other foodware)

    • Introduce plastic free aisles/areas for fresh fruit and veg

    • Encourage the use of reusable containers at the butcher, deli, etc. and charge for disposable containers by 2021

    • Negotiate with suppliers on their use of plastic packaging to eliminate unnecessary packaging

    • Set new requirements for internal bulk supplies that reduce plastic packaging waste through reusable/returnable supply containers and ensuring that all discarded packaging is composted or recycled

      Note: see Reusable Containers page for further information on standards

     

    Back to Zero Plastic Pollution page >>


  • published Policies for Action 2020-06-29 09:16:02 +1000

    Policies for Action

    Our aim is the introduction of legislation and financial supports to solve Australia's plastic pollution problems – creating a 'circular economy'. Action needs to be mainstream – not pilots and case studies that work at the edge of society and the economy.

    Like many jurisdictions around the world, Australia has committed to a target of all packaging being either reusable, compostable or recyclable by 2025. Achieving this means focusing on avoiding and reducing unnecessary single use plastics; and reusing, composting or recycling the rest. The landfilling, incineration or energy recovery of plastic wastes is rejected by Boomerang and key experts and jurisdictions as part of a circular economy approach.

     

    Our Goals

    1. A strengthened Product Stewardship Act 2011 to specifically address plastic packaging and mandate national targets.

    2. Addressing greenwash labelling to ensure that all packaging labelled as reusable, compostable or recyclable will be reused, composted or recycled in practice and at scale.

    3. The phase-out of problematic and unnecessary plastics by supporting best practice legislation by state and territory jurisdictions, and continue the process, through continuous improvement, to deal with other problem plastics.

    4. A ban on the export of waste plastics, but coupled with the provision of Commonwealth and State investment in modernised composting and recycling facilities, and the setting of consistent recycled content procurement policies in all Australian jurisdictions.

    5. Ensuring circular economy principles, and practices are applied, in all national and state/territory waste policies and programs.

    6. The banning of plastic packaging from landfill, incinerators and waste-to-energy facilities before 2025 in all jurisdictions.

    7. Pressuring all jurisdictions to apply effective and consistent waste avoidance and resource recovery practices. This includes a particular focus on effective plastic bag bans (New South Wales and updating older laws in other states and addressing thicker bags) and best practice container refund schemes (Victoria and Tasmania).

    8. The introduction of a national/state-engaged Plastic Pollution Reduction Plan to address single use plastics in the home, away from home, in agriculture, in business and industry and in the marine environment, including a strategy of continuous improvement.

    9. Fund research into the extent, sources and impacts of plastics/micro-plastics on the environment and human and wildlife health. This should include the establishment of citizen science programs that add to scientific understanding and litter data collection.

    10. Increase funding support for marine and litter clean-ups. Support Commonwealth direct involvement and resourcing of global initiatives that reduce plastic use and litter generation. Assist regional neighbours with litter clean-up activities and economic development programs centred on plastics recovery and recycling.

     

    Back to Zero Plastic Pollution page >>


  • published Zero Plastic Pollution in Campaigns 2020-06-29 09:14:35 +1000

    Zero Plastic Pollution

    'At least 8 million tonnes of plastic leak into the ocean every year. By 2025 the oceans will contain one tonne of plastic for every three tonnes of fish and by 2050 more plastic than fish' - Joint EM Foundation/World Economic Forum Report Davos 2016

    Globally 95% of all plastic packaging is used once and then wasted, often as litter. In Australia we recycle 9% of plastic (with just 16% of plastic packaging recovered). The CSIRO reports that 'three-quarters of the marine debris found along our coastline is plastic, most from local sources.'

    According to the latest CleanUp Australia Report (2019), plastic represents 31% of all litter collected. Plastic bag litter remains unacceptably high despite state (with the exception of NSW) and supermarkets bans. Heavyweight plastic bags are still available in all states and territories.

    Virtually all of this discarded plastic does not decompose but, over time, ‘breaks up’ into ever smaller pieces (microplastics). The marine plastic problem is both about the plastic litter we can see and the plastic litter we can’t. It accumulates in the environment, year on year.

    Australia needs to solve this problem, urgently. Over the next 24 months to 2022 we will be campaigning for governments to implement the legal and financial instruments to achieve a significant reduction in plastic pollution.

    Source: Clean Up Australia Report, 2019

     

    Our goals

    • To transition to a zero-waste society by leveraging strategic opportunities to drive best practice resource efficiency, recovery and recycling.

    • To eliminate unnecessary and problematic single use plastics from use.

    • To cut 70% of Australia’s contribution to plastic pollution entering the oceans (before 2025).

     

    Our Five key programs



  • published NSW Plastics Plan 2020 in Latest 2020-04-27 15:50:22 +1000

    REDUCING SINGLE USE PLASTICS IN NEW SOUTH WALES: HAVE YOUR SAY

    The NSW government has just released a discussion paper Cleaning Up Our Act: Redirecting the Future Plastics in NSW. The paper seeks public views on what action NSW should be doing to address plastic pollution in the State. 

    discussion-paper-cover.jpgDid you know that 75% of marine debris found around the coastline of Australia is plastic, and comes from local land-based sources?

    The New South Wales Government has released its Cleaning Up Our Act- Redirecting the Future of Plastics in NSW Discussion Paper. It is seeking your views on how plastic waste and litter could be reduced, with four outcomes:

    • The phase-out of single use plastics
    • Tripling the proportion of plastics recycled in NSW by 2030
    • Reducing plastic litter by 25% by 2025
    • Making NSW a leader in plastic research and innovation

    A welcome, long awaited promise is to phase-out lightweight plastic shopping bags (less than 35 microns thick, including those made from degradable and 'compostable' plastic).

    If you prefer to have the discussion paper read to you, Boomerang Alliance together with our allies have made a recording of the Discussion Paper Reading done in four parts which you can view below. 

     

    TAKE ACTION!


    ACTION 1: COMPLETE THE SHORT SURVEY

    The short survey should take about 5 minutes to complete - https://yoursay.dpie.nsw.gov.au/plastics-plan/short-survey  We have created a document for you to download as a guideline to help you complete the short survey. 

    ACTION 2: COMPLETE THE DETAILED SURVEY

    The detailed survey should take about 20 minutes to one hour to complete - https://yoursay.dpie.nsw.gov.au/plastics-plan/detailed-survey 

    ACTION 3: MAKE A SUBMISSION - download the template and adapt/send to plastics.plan@environment.nsw.gov.au

    Due by 5pm on Friday 8 May 2020


    Submission template for individual

    I support urgent action to eliminate problematic and unnecessary single use plastics in NSW, including:

    • A ban of lightweight plastic bags (including degradable and ‘compostable’ bags) in 2020
    • A ban on single-use plastic takeaway items such as straws, stirrers, cutlery, plates/bowls, coffee cups/lids, containers and heavyweight plastic bags in 2021
    • An immediate ban on polystyrene cups, bowls and containers
    • An investigation into and future policies designed to reduce other single use plastics in the home, in retail, business and industry, agriculture and used in the marine environment

    [Your Name and address]

     

    Submission template for organisation

    We have put together a more comprehensive submission template for community groups and organisations. You can download the template and use it as it is (adding your group/organisation's name) or you can amend/add to the text as needed.

     

    NSW PLASTICS PLAN DISCUSSION PAPER READING

     

    PART 1

     

    PART 2

     

    PART 3

     

    PART 4


  • published Boomerang Alliance Newsletter March 2020 in Latest 2020-03-24 14:37:26 +1100

    Boomerang Alliance Newsletter March 2020

    Boomerang’s Director, Jeff Angel attended the National Plastic Summit recently and reports some momentum on action was evident, but current commitments are unlikely to be enough. Read about the 5 core actions we advocated and the updates on our other campaigns. Enjoy our latest newsletter!

     

    Read more

  • Boomerang Alliance Newsletter - March 2020

    March 2020
     
     

    Coronavirus aside we still need urgent and effective action to address plastic pollution, and Boomerang Alliance intends to continue its campaigning. It is important that governments act to reduce the spread and contain the virus, and, it's equally important that they act on plastics. Next year, we hope the virus will be a thing of the past, unfortunately plastic pollution won't be.

    The Plastic Round Up: What's been happening around the country to reduce Single-Use Plastics

    The good news is that a number of State and Territory Governments are starting to act. As a result, we expect some States and Territories to have brought in legislation or planned legislation by the end of 2020, to phase-out certain single use plastic takeaway items. It's not enough but it is a start.

    Here's our round up of what happening state-by state.

    South Australia is introducing legislation to ban plastic straws, stirrers and cutlery, including polystyrene cups, bowls, plates and containers. Assuming the legislation is passed, these items will be banned from 2021.

    The Australian Capital Territory has similar legislation to ban plastic cutlery, stirrers and polystyrene food and beverage containers by 2021 and, within 12 months of the legislation, barrier bags, oxo-degradable products and plastic straws.

    Queensland proposes legislation to ban plastic straws, stirrers, cutlery and plates and following further analysis, coffee cups, cups and heavyweight plastic bags. Assuming legislation is passed, straws, stirrers, cutlery and plates will be banned from 2021

    New South Wales has just released a Public Discussion Paper Cleaning Up Our Act: Redirecting the Future of Plastics in NSW. The paper signals that, at last, the government is seeking to ban lightweight plastic bags. Otherwise the paper seeks public views of what action the government should be taking including the phase-out of single use plastics

    Victoria is starting to catch up with other States having recently introduced a plastic bag ban and now announced a container deposit scheme for 2023. A Sustainability Strategy was recently introduced but it remains unclear what the government intends to do about single use plastics

    Western Australia has banned lightweight plastic bags and introduced a container deposit scheme. In 2019 a Lets not draw the short straw Discussion Paper was published that asked for public views on banning single use plastics. Nothing has been announced on single use plastics since.

    Tasmania introduced a plastic bag ban in 2013 and now plans a container deposit scheme by 2023. Apart from the city of Hobart which is planning to ban single use plastic takeaway items this year, the State Government has not announced any intended action.

    Northern Territory has a ban on lightweight plastic bags and a container deposit scheme. The Territory was an early adopter on both measures. We are not aware of any further measures on single use plastics by the government.

    Boomerang Alliance is encouraged by the policies of South Australia, ACT and Queensland. Our campaign is aimed at getting the best possible legislation in place and urgently lobbying all other jurisdictions to follow suit. We want single use plastics, starting with the most littered takeaway items, banned as soon as possible right across Australia.

    We appreciate all your support in our campaigns for zero plastic pollution.

     
    CAMPAIGN UPDATES
     

    PLASTIC SUMMIT - OUR 5 CORE ISSUES

    Boomerang’s Director, Jeff Angel attended the National Plastic Summit recently and reports some momentum on action was evident, but current commitments are unlikely to be enough. Read about the 5 core actions we advocated.


    CASH FOR CONTAINERS – AUSTRALIA-WIDE!

    Our long running campaign for a national container deposit scheme (CDS), supported by thousands of people and dozens of environment groups has had great success with the last two states joining up.


     PLASTIC FREE PLACES

    Our program is now active in 5 communities across Australia (Adelaide, Byron, Perth, Cairns & Townsville). Combined (excl. Cairns & Townsville which commenced last month), we have eliminated over 5 million pieces of single-use plastic! 


    SUP NETWORK NEWS

    There are exciting developments around the country when it comes to changes in law to reduce Single Use Plastics (the bad SUPs, we love the good ol' Stand Up Paddleboard!). Find out what we are doing to lobby for change. 

       
     
    HAVE YOUR SAY - Reducing Single Use Plastics

    The New South Wales Government has released its Cleaning Up Our Act - Redirecting the Future of Plastics in NSW Discussion Paper and the Queensland Government has announced plans to introduce legislation to phase out certain plastic products. 

    Take action now and email your submission, the more submissions that support a single use plastics phase-out, the more likely it is to happen.

        


     
    We would not have been able to do all these works without our supporters. Please donate so we can continue our fight against plastic pollution.
     

     


  • Reducing Single Use Plastics in New South Wales: Have Your Say

    Did you know that 75% of marine debris found around the coastline of Australia is plastic, and comes from local land-based sources?

    The New South Wales Government has released its Cleaning Up Our Act- Redirecting the Future of Plastics in NSW Discussion Paper. It is seeking your views on how plastic waste and litter could be reduced, with four outcomes:

    • The phase-out of single use plastics
    • Tripling the proportion of plastics recycled in NSW by 2030
    • Reducing plastic litter by 25% by 2025
    • Making NSW a leader in plastic research and innovation

    A welcome, long awaited promise is to phase-out lightweight plastic shopping bags (less than 35 microns thick, including those made from degradable and 'compostable' plastic).

    You can read the discussion paper and respond via their simple or longer survey at https://yoursay.dpie.nsw.gov.au/plastics-plan - we encourage you to make a submission (closing date 8 May). You can make an individual submission by sending your views (key points below) to - plastics.plan@environment.nsw.gov.au.

    The more submissions that support a single use plastics phase-out, the more likely it is to happen. Please act as soon as possible.

     

    SUBMISSION TEMPLATE

    I support urgent action to eliminate problematic and unnecessary single use plastics in NSW, including:

    • A ban of lightweight plastic bags (including degradable and ‘compostable’ bags) in 2020
    • A ban on single-use plastic takeaway items such as straws, stirrers, cutlery, plates/bowls, coffee cups/lids, containers and heavyweight plastic bags in 2021
    • An immediate ban on polystyrene cups, bowls and containers
    • An investigation into and future policies designed to reduce other single use plastics in the home, in retail, business and industry, agriculture and used in the marine environment

     

    Your Name and address

     

    Back to March 2020 Newsletter page >>


  • published Mattress Recycling in Past Campaigns 2020-02-24 12:22:24 +1100

    Mattress Recycling

    End of life mattress recovery, recycling and refurbishment is a valuable activity that delivers significant environmental and economic benefits. For every tonne of used mattress material recycled there is an estimated 1.5tonnes of Co2‐e savings in greenhouse gas material and some 25M3 (cubic metres) of landfill space preserved.

    Read more

  • published Toxic Tyres in Past Campaigns 2020-02-24 12:04:56 +1100

    Toxic Tyres

    Did you know that a tyre dump on fire can burn for months and even years, spewing toxic pollution into the air?  Tyres are also the perfect habitat for disease carrying mosquitos, and have been implicated in the spread of dengue and ross river fever. Tyres are recognised internationally as one of the most hazardous wastes.

    Enregistrer

    Read more

  • published Past Campaigns in Campaigns 2020-02-24 11:55:06 +1100

    Past Campaigns

    Mattress Recycling
    Posted by · February 24, 2020 12:22 PM

    Toxic Tyres
    Posted by · February 24, 2020 12:04 PM

    See all posts

  • published Plastic Free South Australia Project Launch in Latest 2019-12-17 12:23:19 +1100

    Plastic Free South Australia Project Launch

    On Saturday 14th December 2019. Hon. David Speirs MP, Minister for Environment and Water, launched the Plastic Free SA project.

    At the launch, South Australia’s first 'Plastic Free Champion' Brick + Mortar Creative, was identified using the Boomerang Alliance's Plastic Free Places guidelines. On hand with the Minister was Boomerang Alliance Director, Jeff Angel, Taryn Hansen, Plastic Free SA Coordinator and Elizabeth Donaldson, Brick + Mortar Creative Director.

    Plastic Free Champions are those cafes who have eliminated plastic coffee cups/lids, straws, foodware (cutlery, cups etc), takeaway containers, thick plastic bags and plastic water bottles. They provide reusable foodware instead, and where they can’t, 100% certified compostable packaging.

    The Minister also took the opportunity to release the draft Single-use and Other Plastic Products (Waste Avoidance) Bill 2019 for public comment. This proposes a ban on plastic straws, stirrers and cutlery and certain other single use plastics in South Australia. Comments are sought by 7 February 2020.

    https://www.greenindustries.sa.gov.au/plastics

    Download the media release from Hon David Speirs MP, Minister for Environment and Water

    Read more


  • Expanding Container Deposit Schemes

    A Boomerang Alliance Backgrounder.

    A Container Deposit Scheme (CDS) or refund scheme is in place or planned in all states and territories - except Victoria. Boomerang Alliance continues to campaign for this to change in Victoria.

    Read more

  • A National Plastic Pollution Reduction Strategy

    A Boomerang Alliance Backgrounder.

    According to global data, 95% of single use plastic packaging is used once and then thrown away[1]. This single use plastic includes takeaway packaging. It also includes products used in horticulture, in industry and in the marine environment. Whilst many governments are getting more active on restricting plastic bags and some takeaway packaging, many other forms of single use plastics are going under the radar.

    Read more

  • A Ban on Thick Plastic Carrier Bags

    A Boomerang Alliance Backgrounder.

    The ban on lightweight plastic bags in Australia, except NSW has had a significant impact on litter and consumer behaviour.

    Read more

  • MEM 2019: Boomerang Alliance Letter of Recommendation to the Environment Ministers

    Australia's environment ministers will be meeting in early November to agree on an action plan and Boomerang Alliance sent a letter of recommendations to the ministers.

    Read more


  • published 2019 Meeting of Environment Ministers (MEM) 2019-10-26 00:32:32 +1100

    SAVE RECYCLING & STOP PLASTIC POLLUTION 

    On Friday 8 November the Commonwealth and State/Territory Environment Ministers are meeting in Adelaide to decide the future of recycling in Australia and discuss urgent action on plastic pollution. There has been a lot of talk so far and as these meetings only happen twice a year - the community and the environment need to see results.

    What Boomerang Alliance wants from Environment Ministers to Save Recycling and create a Circular Economy:

    • Action on the national ban on the export of mixed waste and contaminated recyclables and commitment to investment in domestic recycling.
    • Agreement on procurement policies for recycled content in products by government and business, that will create a market for recyclables, particularly plastics.
    • Expand all state/territory Container Deposit Schemes to include wine and spirit containers and potentially refillable containers; a requirement that all collected containers have significant recycled content from 2023; and consideration of an increase in the deposit on containers to 20 cents by 2023 if best practice targets not met.
    • An enforceable product stewardship scheme for packaging that sets mandatory requirements to minimise virgin materials and toxicity, and ensure it is designed for easy and economically viable recovery (for reuse, composting or recycling).

    What Boomerang Alliance wants from Environment Ministers to Stop Plastic Pollution:

    • A Plastic Bag Ban (com'on NSW) and Container Deposit Scheme (wake-up Victoria) in each State.
    • A national phase-out of thick plastic bags by 2021.
    • A phase-out of single use (non-compostable) takeaway packaging, including coffee cups/lids, straws, cups and containers, cutlery, bags and plastic bottles, by 2021.
    • Support for a National Plastic Pollution Reduction Strategy to attack other sources of plastic harm.

    Check out our letter of recommendations to ministers here.

     

    WANT TO KNOW MORE?

    Boomerang Alliance is posting a series of blogs on our key goals and we will have updates on ministerial responses; other developments prior to and from the November meeting.  Also keep track of the campaign on Facebook.

    > Follow Boomerang Alliance Meeting of Environment Ministers 2019 Blog

    After each meeting Environment Ministers release a communique which you can see here. - you can check out the result from 8 Nov here.

     

    WANT TO DO MORE?

    Take a photo of yourself with a recycled product you have bought or found (in a store), use the hashtags #buyrecycled #circulareconomy, tag and message us on Facebook or send an email to lisa.wriley@boomerangalliance.org.au before Tuesday 5/11/19. We will share these images on our Facebook page in the days leading up to the Meeting of Environment Ministers (MEM) and with the Federal and State Environment ministers before the MEM on Friday 8/11/19. See example below.

    SOCIAL MEDIA 'HANDLES'

    When you use these in your posts or tweets it also goes to the person whose 'handle' you use:

    • Sussan Ley
      Twitter: @sussanley
      Facebook: @SussanLeyMP

    • Trevor Evans
      Twitter: @TrevorEvansBne
      Facebook: @trevorevansbne

     

    YOU CAN SEND AN EMAIL TO THE ENVIRONMENT MINISTERS


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